Industry Tag

Lonaconing Silk Mill
Lonaconing Silk Mill Workshop

The Lonaconing Silk Mill is the last intact silk mill in the United States. Located within the highlands of western Maryland in the small community of Lonaconing, the silk mill closed in 1957 and remains completely preserved. Despite this, it is listed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

The Abandoned Lonaconing Silk Mill hands-on workshop is designed for entry level to moderately experienced photographers. Learn the basic operations of your SLR/dSLR camera, composure, what f/stop, shutter speed and ISO are and how they relate to exposure, the basics exposure bracketing and high dynamic range, the use of remotes and tripods, and introductory flash and lighting setup.

We will move about the silk mill during the four hours, allowing you to experiment and learn how to best use your camera. You will make mistakes – but we will be there to answer any and all questions and help you become a better photographer! After the event is over, a dedicated forum will be set up so that you can post your photos for critique and commentary by Abandoned.

  • Cost: $160/person
  • Capacity: Minimum 5, maximum 10
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Slate Furnace
Slate Furnace

Kentucky’s oldest iron furnace helped win the War of 1812 down in New Orleans.

Slate Furnace, located along Slate Creek near present-day Owingsville, was constructed in 1791 for the purpose of smelting iron ore from local deposits for ten gallon kettles, which were in great demand by the early pioneers. The kettles allowed water to evaporate from the salt springs for salt, and to boil the sap of maple trees for sugar.

War production proved to be more lucrative.

In 1807, Colonel Thomas Deye Owings was contracted to supply cannon balls to the American Navy. Ammunition was brought to Maysville via oxcart and then floated down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. During the War of 1812, the Bourbon Iron Furnace supplied the Army Corps of Artillery with cannonballs, grapeshot and canisters. Much of the product was floated down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans.

After 47 years of operation, the Slate Furnace made its last blast in August 1838.

Find out more about Slate Furnace and other early iron furnaces »

Abandoned in Place
Abandoned in Place: NASA’s Space Facilities

The United States was on the forefront of space exploration and research during the Cold War, a status that has since been superseded by other developing nations and Russia. Over the ensuing decades, space launch and miscellaneous facilities were used, reused, deactivated and abandoned all across the nation.

Roland Miller has taken it upon himself to document these locations that were the base for the first unmanned space flights to excursions to the moon in his new book, Abandoned in Place.

The facilities photographed in Abandoned in Place portray one of the most historic and technical adventures of the last century–from our first unmanned flights beyond the atmosphere to landing men on the moon. A sense of the urgency of the space race is evident in many of the images. Signs and labels in the images reflect the technology of the era. The structures depicted also recall the darker threat of nuclear war. Some of the images describe a future that could have been if the cold war had heated up. These launch complexes, engine test stands, and wind tunnels are the Bunker Hills and Gettysburgs of the cold war. References to the Great Pyramids, Chichen Itza, Stonehenge, and other major archaeological sites foreshadow the future of these modern ruins.

The upcoming book features scenes of launch towers, test stands, tunnels and control rooms from the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to the Kennedy Space C enter in Cape Canaveral, Florida and the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, among other locations.

Old Crow Distillery
On Set

Several weeks ago, while being filmed for a segment for Kentucky Life, I took the opportunity to walk around Old Crow Distillery in central Kentucky. Not much has changed with the grounds, although it appears that the property may lay dormant for the foreseeable future. I sincerely hope that the buildings will be preserved; the owners are currently looking for a buyer!

Lonaconing Silk Mill
Lonaconing Silk Mill Photo Event

The Lonaconing Silk Mill is the last intact silk mill in the United States. Located within the highlands of western Maryland in the small community of Lonaconing, the silk mill closed in 1957 and remains completely preserved. Despite this, it is listed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

The Abandoned Lonaconing Silk Mill photo event is now in its third year. Come check out and photograph and explore this industrial relic on your own, and to help preserve the silk mill for future generations!

  • Cost: $120/person; $20/model; $20/assistant
  • Capacity: Minimum 10, maximum 20
  • Restrictions: Limited electricity
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Thurmond, West Virginia
4 must see New River ghost towns

Ghost towns along the New River in West Virginia are aplenty. What makes these three unique is that they lay within the New River Gorge National River. Prior to the creation of the national park in the late 1970’s, much of the land was used for the production of coal and coke. Small, company-owned towns were developed for the miners and their families, and when those mines closed out – so did the boroughs. Go explore Kay Moor, Nuttallburg, Fayette and Thurmond this weekend while the weather is still warm!

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Old Louis Hunter Distillery
Old Louis Hunter Distillery

Several years ago, while in college, I stumbled upon the Old Louis Hunter Distillery in Harrison County, Kentucky on a scenic back road drive, but owing to the weather at the time, I did not venture out of the car to take a closer glance at the abandoned industrial complex. I moved to Cincinnati shortly thereafter and forgot about the relic along the banks of the South Fork Licking River.

Several weekends ago, while photographing historic antebellum residences in the Bluegrass region of the state, I stumbled upon the abandoned industrial complex once again. The buildings, once part of the Old Louis Hunter Distillery, operated in some fashion from 1850 until 1974. Read More

Indiana Ammunitions Depot
Walking Dead

Exploring a disused military ammunition depot brings back thoughts of the Walking Dead. Perhaps it is because I have been binge watching the post-apocalyptic horror series on television, or rather that I have a fascination with post-human interactions. And because of that, I went through my archives and found some great images that I have never shared that evokes that resemblance. Read More